What Do The Lakers and Temarry Recycling Have in Common?

Posted by Larry Burton on Apr 19, 2018 1:27:51 PM

At first glance, you may be wondering what on earth we are talking about. How can a basketball team and Temarry Recycling have anything in common at all? But if you give me a few minutes, I’ll show you exactly what they have in common.

When it comes to the NBA and the recycling industry it turns out there is more in common than just rehiring the same old coaches and "garbage time". lakers-sustainability

Take the Los Angeles Lakers, for example...a team with a fresh approach under young coach Luke Walton, age 37, whose vision is one of a sustainable approach that he hopes will net the team wins in the future and not just today.

In Walton's first season in 2016, the Lakers got off to a good start but didn't have a system in place to sustain their positive play. This season the Lakers got off to a good start again, but Walton noted that their success was now "sustainable" thanks to key new players and a defense-first concept.

The result is more wins (28) than the Lakers total last year (26), and there are still 20 games left to play in the season. For Lakers fans, "garbage time" -- that time in a basketball game when the score is so lopsided both teams empty their benches and the play often becomes less than pretty -- is more enjoyable this season as the team is more likely to be up by a big score than to be trailing by a lot of points.

 

Sustainability – Temarry and The Lakers

 

At Temarry Recycling we obviously know a lot about "sustainability" -- it's our business!  And we are big fans of Walton's sustainable approach, and not just because we are a San Diego-based company and Luke is the son of San Diego area native and NBA Hall of Famer Bill Walton. We also like his approach because, like the Lakers, Temarry Recycling has been adding some key new elements to the industry and embracing a sustainable process of closed-loop recycling with remarkable results.

The Lakers success in 2017-18 was about introducing three new starters -- Lonzo Ball, Kentavious Caldwell-Pope and Brook Lopez -- and then developing a team concept around defense and becoming one of the top teams in the league scoring points off second chances.

In similar fashion, Temarry added in additional components to our recycling process that gave us a much more sustainable approach in handling spent solvents.  With the addition of Waste to Energy and Water Treatment components, a true closed-loop recycling process was developed.

In much the same way as the Lakers knew a more sustainable approach was needed in order to progress as a team and become more efficient on offense and defense, Temarry knew a more sustainable approach was needed to provide corporate America with a truly sustainable process that would meet their business mandates today and tomorrow.

If you were diagramming a play on a whiteboard during a timeout like Walton does for the Lakers, then think of the old system of being "take-make-dispose", where in the end the waste product is not put to use. The new paradigm being drawn up on Temarry's whiteboard is one of "make-use-return" in which we are able to recycle everything with nothing going to landfill. 

 

circular-economy

 

The new players for Temarry may not be as colorful as Lonzo Ball, with his own shoe contract as a rookie and his teammates, but they are just as effective.

 

Temarry's starting line-up includes Waste to Energy; Water Treatment; and Solvent Distillation. When these elements work together as a team, we are able to create a true closed-loop recycling system.

Let’s take a closer look:

 Temarry-Recycling-True Recycling Diagram 

Parallels can be drawn from many different places that can at times provide us with a deeper understanding of a concept or premise. The new Lakers approach that Luke Walton has instituted reminded us of our own process and how important it is to constantly strive look for ways to improve and become a better company.

 

Even in the two different worlds of sports and recycling, common ground can be found that can open a window and spark interest into how a process can be built and be used for the betterment of everyone.

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